LaToya Ruby Frazier lecturing in 2015.

LaToya Ruby Frazier lecturing in 2015.

The Skowhegan Lecture Archive is composed of 645 lectures delivered by faculty artists in the uniquely intimate setting of our campus in rural Maine. Recorded each year since 1952, the lectures have amassed into an invaluable archive of candid talks by artists as diverse as Vito Acconci, Janine Antoni, John Cage and Merce Cunningham, Kiki Smith, Fred Wilson, and Ryan Trecartin and Lizzie Fitch. It continues to grow each summer. 

Skowhegan is currently exploring new ways of sharing this resource with artists and researchers in a manner that sustains our ongoing archival efforts. To this end, we are reaching out to schools to assess interest in the Skowhegan Lecture Archive, as well as gain an understanding of each school's infrastructure and potential methods of managing it. This will help us determine our best course of action towards making the archive as accessible as possible while preserving the characteristics that make it singular.

This survey is for our own research only. It will not be shared or linked to you or your school in any way. However, if you would like to discuss our archival program in greater detail, please contact our Archives Coordinator M.E. Zadlo at mzadlo@skowheganart.org. For the full list of artists included in our archive, please view them here.

Alex Katz lecturing in 1975.

Alex Katz lecturing in 1975.

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Please include non-BFA students and researchers if possible.
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